Prospect High School

Skip to main content

Math Department

Photo Credit: Ron Garcia  
 
 
Not pictured:Erick Nguyen
Mathematics Courses Offered at Prospect

Integrated Math 1: This is a one-year college prep course that meets state graduation requirements for Algebra 1. This course includes the following topics: An overview of functions (linear, quadratic and exponential) in functional form, graphs, and tables; Linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables; Geometric constructions; Congruence and rigid motions; Geometric relationships and properties of triangles, parallel lines, quadrilaterals and circles; Analyzing and interpreting data in one and two variables.

Integrated Math 2: This is a one-year college prep course that meets state graduation requirements for Geometry. This course includes the following topics: Similarity; Coordinate geometry; Trigonometric ratios; Quadratic functions; Quadratic equations; Probability.

Integrated Math 3: The following units will be covered in Integrated Math 3: Statistics (Random Processes), Circles and Conics, Trigonometric Functions, Exponential Functions, Functions Capstone, Rationale and Polynomial Expressions. This course will complete the 3 year Integrated Math series and includes remaining High School Common Core Math Standards that are not covered in Integrated Math 1 and Integrated Math 2.

Integrated Math 3 STEM: This course is designed for students who are interested in pursuing STEM fields in college. This course is an enhanced course and not an honors course and will cover topics above the Integrated Math 3 course, including vectors, complex numbers and advanced trigonometric function analysis. The following units will be covered in Integrated Math 3 STEM: Statistics (Random Processes), Circles and Conics, Trigonometric Functions, Vectors, Exponential Functions, Functions Capstone, Rational and Polynomial Expressions. This course will complete the 3 year Integrated Math series and includes the remaining High School Common Core Math Standards and a variety of the "plus" standards that are not covered in Integrated Math 1 and Integrated Math 2.

Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus: The fourth course in the college prep sequence, Trigonometry/Pre- Calculus, integrates all the skills and concepts mastered prior to Calculus. It includes trigonometric functions (circular and triangular), identities and multiple angle formulas, graphing, DeMoivre‘s theorem, sequences and series, mathematical induction, partial fractions, polynomial and rational functions, higher-order equations and inequalities, limits, exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphing calculators may be used.

Advanced Placement Calculus: Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing the students‘ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications.
The courses emphasize a multi representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. The connections among these representations also are important.
Prerequisite: Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus

Advanced Placement Statistics: The AP Statistics course lends itself naturally to a mode of teaching that engages students in constructing their own knowledge. For example, students working individually or in small groups can plan and perform data collection and analyses where the teacher serves in the role of a consultant, rather than a director. This approach gives students ample opportunity to think through problems, make decisions and share questions and conclusions with other students as well as with the teacher. Important components of the course should include the use of technology, projects and laboratories, cooperative group problem- solving, and writing, as a part of concept-oriented instruction and assessment. This approach to teaching AP Statistics will allow students to build interdisciplinary connections with other subjects and with their world outside school.

Advanced Placement Computer Science: The AP Computer Science course is an introductory course in computer science. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundament data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods.
Prerequisite: Completion of Integrated Math 3 or higher.